Our tour here is 1/3 done :(

What post about the awesomeness of Oman is complete without the requisite Wadi Shab photo?

Yes, I feel so strongly about that I needed to put an emoticon in the subject line.

Folks, the past eight months have flown by. Like, I feel like we got here maybe 2 months ago. I’ve counted it off on my fingers several times just to make sure we are actually at the 8-month mark. (And I just did it again.)

Classic Oman: sand and camels in the Wahiba Sands

One thing I’ve learned in life is that things can go to shit real fast. Keeping that in mind, with every week that goes by, I remind myself how lucky I am. Oman is a truly incredible place, and we are very fortunate to be here. That might seem like a crazy thing to say, given the fact that we are in the Middle East, bordering Yemen, with Iran just across the Straight of Hormuz, but Oman is such a special place.

The beautiful Dayminiat Islands

Don’t get me wrong, there are things about Oman, or at least Muscat, that annoy me. Like the driving. The other day we were sitting at an intersection, and the light had just turned red. We watched a car turn right and head in the opposite direction from us, and then inexplicably do a 3-point turn and turn around, going in the wrong direction. He then proceeded to plow over the 8-inch tall median (in a sedan, nonetheless, so he must have really been keeping his foot on the gas) and t-bone a car waiting for the light to turn going in the opposite direction from us. It was nothing short of ridiculous. Nate was worried the driver had had a heart attack because why else would you drive like that, but then the driver got out the car and started pointing at the dude he’d just t-boned like he’d something wrong.  It was mind-boggling. I am convinced that if it weren’t for the red light cameras, all hell would break loose.

Deep under water, where crazy drivers aren’t a problem. We saw turtles, along with electric rays, moray eels, and loads of fish while scuba diving off Jissah Point.

But, for the most part, I feel like we have things figured out and we’re able to spend our weekends exploring and having fun. There are a few things that we brought with us or purchased since arriving here that have helped us to maximize our fun, or at least made life a little easier.

Bimmah Sinkhole

Here, in no particular order, are a few things that I would recommend you have when in Oman:

  • A large, durable water bladder.  We keep one of these MSR bags in our car all the time. It’s perfect for rinsing off after the beach and doubles as an emergency water supply if necessary.
  • A beach tent/shelter. The tent we had previously would blow away like a sail with every strong gust of wind, and I got tired of chasing it down the beach. This tent is anchored with sandbags and an attached floor that you weigh down with all your stuff. It’s stayed put through several strong wind gusts that would have certainly uprooted the other tent. This tent is also amazingly easy to put up and take down; I can do it by myself in less than 5 minutes.
  • For the ladies, I give you the perfect pants for hot climates. They are also great for traveling and hiking, and if you have to wade into the water at the beach fully clothed these pants will dry in less than half an hour. I got my first pair at 40% off, and given that summer and Ramadan are coming I recently bought a second pair at full price. At $79 these pants are an investment, but totally and completely worth it.
  • Oman Off-Road is the best guide for exploring Oman, and definitely worth the $50 price tag. You an buy it at any Borders book store (yes, those still exist here) and at some grocery stores. It is full of helpful info and you can do some of the routes in a sedan. I just wish it was spiral bound because it is so big that when I open it in the car the sides hang off my lap.
  • Shoes you can wear in and out of the water. We use Chacos, but Tevas or Keens would also work.

Water/hiking shoes an absolute must if you want to explore Wadi Al Arbaeen

  • A CamelBak or some other on-the-go hydration system. When we go hiking, Nate carries M in the metal-framed hiking pack and we use a 2-liter Platypus in our day hiking pack, which I carry. Everyone, including M, drinks out of the Platypus.
  • A high-clearance vehicle with four wheel drive, if you really want to explore and go on adventures. You can rent one, but most of them have a 200 kilometer per day milage limit (we learned this the hard way). Our CR-V is great for day-to-day driving, but she can’t handle anything more than light off-roading.

    You need 4WD to get past the police checkpoint if you want to explore Jebel Akhdar

  • An unlocked cell phone. The two main cellular companies here, Omantel and Oredoo, have shops in the airport and you can easily get a SIM card as soon as you arrive. They just need a photocopy of your passport. The cellular network here is pretty good, although I think Omantel is stronger than Oredoo. You can use Waze for turn-by-turn directions (not Google Maps) to get just about anywhere.

I’m glad we have 16 more months to explore Oman. There’s still so much we haven’t done: Jebel Shams, Salalah, Masirah Island, Musandam, the Sugar Dunes, Wadi Tiwi, the list goes on.

Al Thorwah Hot Springs, near Nakhal Fort

Also, if I do say so myself, if these photos don’t convince you to come visit Oman, you are immune to fun and adventure!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.